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Label:
Name: NAXOS
Number: NAX8557704

Country: GERMANY
CAPTAIN BLOOD: SWASHBUCKLER SUITES (CD)
Composed by: Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Max Steiner, Miklos Rozsa, Victor Young

Digital world premiere recording.

Richard Kaufman conducts the Brandenburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Potsdam.

1. THE KING'S THIEF 7:35
Miklos Rosza
Reconstructed by Christopher Palmer

SCARAMOUCHE
Victor Young
Reconstructed by William Stromberg
2. Main Title 1:34
3. Vanished Merchant 2:06
4. The Tomb, André and Aline 3:47
5. Why? 1:48
6. Pavane 2:18
7. André escapes 1:37
8. The Big Apple 1:24
9. The Magic Box/Roses and Napoleon 3:24
10. End Cast 0:46

CAPTAIN BLOOD
Erich Wolfgang Korngold
Reconstructed by John Morgan
11. Main title 2:49
12. Slaves/Arabella and Blood 6:57
13. Tortuga 1:46
14. Port Royal, Island of Magra, English and Pirates Ship 5:06
15. Pirates Flag 1:40
16. Finale 1:32

THE THREE MUSKETEERS
Max Steiner
Arranged by John Morgan
17. To Paris/Fencing Demonstration 3:47
18. Love Theme 4:07
19. Fight Behind Palace 2:07
20. Night Time/Pigeons 2:56
21. Carriage Ride 2:45
22. Finale 3:05

THE KING'S THIEF - Director Robert Z. Leonard brought his 31-year association with MGM to a rousing close with "The King's Thief." Set in England during the reign of Charles II (drolly portrayed by George Sanders), the film stars Edmund Purdom as Michael Dermott, who sets about to steal the crown jewels on behalf of his King. The current possessor of the gems is the wicked Duke of Brampton, played with relish by a cast-against-type David Niven. Ann Blyth is a decorative heroine, while one of Michael Dermott's cohorts is played by a young, muscular Roger Moore. The plot of "The King's Thief," purportedly based on fact, is merely an excuse for the nonstop swashbuckling of star Edmund Purdom. 1955

SCARAMOUCHE - This delightful adaptation of Rafael Sabatini's swashbuckling novel stars Stewart Granger as Andre Moreau, an 18th-century French nobleman who is publicly humiliated by the Marquis de Maynes (Mel Ferrer). Challenged to a sword duel by the Marquis, Andre, who knows nothing about fencing, runs away, taking refuge with a theatrical troupe. He hides behind the personality of Scaramouche, a zany clown, and in his spare time romances his sexy leading lady Lenore (Eleanor Parker). Seeking revenge against de Maynes, Andre takes fencing lessons from swordmaster Doutreval (John Dehner). It isn't long before Andre has developed a reputation as the finest swordsman in France--which, as intended, arouses the ire of de Maynes. The two opponents face off in a deserted theater; the ensuing sword duel, running nearly seven minutes, is one of the best ever committed to film. Before he can plunge his blade into de Maynes, Andre discovers that he and the Marquis are half-brothers. The two men instantly forget their differences, and Andre's honor is fully restored. He ends up not in the arms of the sensuous Lenore but with a woman of his own class, Aline de Gavrillac (Janet Leigh)--while a gag ending reveals that Lenore has found herself a new and highly influential boyfriend. Lewis Stone, star of the 1923 silent version of Scaramouche, appears in the remake in the supporting role of Georges de Valmorin. 1952

CAPTAIN BLOOD - When British actor Robert Donat dropped out of Warner Bros. "Captain Blood," the studio took a chance on its new contractee, Tasmania-born Errol Flynn. Adapted from the novel by Rafael Sabatini, the film is set during the oppressive reign of King James II. Irish physician Peter Blood (Errol Flynn), arrested for treating a wounded anti-crown rebel, is condemned to slavery in Jamaica. Here he earns several privileges after treating the governor (George Hassell) for gout; this does not rest well with Lionel Atwill, the wicked owner of the plantation on which Blood is forced to work. Nor is Atwill pleased with the growing relationship between his niece Arabella (Olivia DeHavilland) and the imprisoned doctor. An attack on Jamaica by Spanish pirates gives Blood and his fellow slaves the opportunity to become buccaneers themselves. After several months of fighting and plunder, Blood's men capture a merchant ship bearing Arabella. Blood fights a duel with a French pirate (Basil Rathbone) over the girl; having "won" her, Blood intends to have his way with her, but his more decent instincts prevail. When King James is overthrown by William of Orange, Blood is given a commission and lauded as a hero as a reward for his bravery against the Spanish galleons. He is appointed governor of Jamaica, wins the hand of the lovely Arabella, and genially forces Atwill to eat crow. This seemingly outsized swashbuckler was actually a very economical production, using stock footage from several silent films. "Captain Blood" transformed the 26-year-old Errol Flynn into a star; he's a little clumsy in the dialogue department at times, but cuts a dashing figure in the action scenes. The film also represented the cinematic debut of composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who wasn't completely happy with his hastily written score and asked that his on-screen credit be diminished to "musical director". 1935

THE THREE MUSKETEERS - This first talkie version of Dumas' "The Three Musketeers" had been planned by RKO Radio as a John Ford production, with Francis Lederer as D'Artagnan. By the time the film emerged on screen, Rowland V. Lee was in the director's chair, with the talented but uncharismatic Walter Abel in the D'Artagnan role. Equally unengaging were Paul Lukas, Moroni Olsen and Onslow Stevens as Athos, Porthos and Aramis, while Margot Grahame was more petulant than menacing as Milady De Winter. Like most filmed adaptations of the Dumas novel, this Three Musketeers concentrates on the episode of the Queen's purloined necklace; the story ends on a misleadingly happy note, with heroine Constance (Heather Angel) alive and kicking at film's end (which she certainly wasn't in the novel). Except for some excellent swordplay -- especially during the opening credits -- this was the dreariest of the many versions of "The Three Musketeers." 1935

  
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